Computer Science MSc | Middlesex University London
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Computer Science MSc

Learn about the course below
Code
PGG404
Start
October 2017
September 2017 (EU/INT induction)
Duration
1 year full-time
2 years part-time
Attendance
Full-time
Part-time
Fees
£8,500 (UK/EU)
£12,500 (INT)
Course leader
Carl Evans

Computer Science influences every aspect of modern life and is one of the fastest-moving academic disciplines and has a huge impact on both economic competitiveness and human wellbeing. This course will equip you with the skills and expertise required to forge a successful career in a wide range of industries.

Why study MSc Computer Science at Middlesex University?

This course not only offers a balance between advanced computer science theory and practical experience, but has a very strong focus on contemporary research. Practical work is an important part of every module and the School of Science and Technology has strong links within the industry, including company giants such as Microsoft and Siemens.

The university is very active in the exploration of a number of key areas within computer Science which you will have the opportunity to focus upon during your studies and individual research project. These include, but are not limited to human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, ubiquitous computing, functional programming, algorithmic biology, and image and video analysis.

This course is designed for those students who have previously studied computing at university level and are looking to develop an advanced mastery of the subject.

Course highlights

  • You will have access to the Human Interactive Systems Laboratory, a centre of research into haptic technology which leads the UK Visual Analytics Consortium
  • Our specialist multimedia laboratories are well-equipped with industry-standard software and hardware, including both PCs and Macs
  • You will be able to work with the authors of widely-used textbooks and learning materials including Dr Kai Xu, Dr Elke Duncker-Gassen and Dr Chris Huyck
  • As a student of this course you'll receive a free electronic textbook for every module

What will you study on the MSc Computer Science?

You will be encouraged to investigate the current areas of research that the university is currently exploring. These include computer graphics, mobile development, robotics, quantum computing, computational biology and visual analytics, amongst many others. You will also have the opportunity to study object-oriented software design and development, agile techniques, human-computer interaction as well as designing and developing interactive visual computer systems.

What will you gain?

As well as an in-depth understanding of your subject, you will also be quipped with the knowledge of analysing, developing and executing complex software, producing software to a given specification, and you’ll be able to use modelling and abstraction techniques to design software systems. This course will provide you with many transferable skills and will improve your research, data collection and interpretation, communication, problem-solving, presentation, and critical skills. The strong focus on principles and concepts will help you develop the capacity for life long independent study.

  • Modules

    • Advanced Topics in Computer Science (30 Credits) - Compulsory

      This module serves two main purposes. Firstly, it gives students an opportunity to complete two short studies as separate teaching blocks of advanced topics in computer science. Students will be able to select topics from a pool of designated options. All designated topics have a close alignment with research activity conducted within the school of Science and Technology, and each elective short-course will be presented by an experienced scholar in the specified field of computer science. The module will also focus on the preparation of a project proposal to be taken forward to the dissertation phase of the programme. To this end, a number of teaching weeks will aim to prepare students in research methods and project planning appropriate to an individual project. These sessions will be integrated at several points within the standard 24 week teaching framework with a view to underpin research and development activities within all the taught modules on the programme.

    • Distributed Systems (30 Credits) - Compulsory

      This course investigates distributed systems and their implementation, realising such concepts as scalability, concurrency, heterogeneity, asynchrony and allowance for graceful degradation and partial failure. In particular, distributed systems are examined from two perspectives: Internet-based systems and cloud-based systems. The module presents the theoretical model for such systems and provides experience in developing and deploying network or web based applications. Supporting language technologies, operating system utilisation and appreciation of protocols involved in data transfer are explored and discussed, ensuring students can critically evaluate and produce appropriate solutions in this area.

    • Interaction and Visualisation (30 Credits) - Compulsory

      To provide students with an understanding of the methods, theories and techniques relevant to the design of interactive visual computer systems. Students will learn relevant principles and practices in human factors, interactive systems design and evaluation, complex data analysis and visualisation design. They will gain experience in researching, designing and evaluating their own solutions and using off-the-shelf toolkits for solving complex visual analytics problems. This will include learning how to conduct user-studies in accordance with relevant legal and ethical requirements. The module offers students knowledge to support future employment or research in interaction design and the related field of visual analytics.

    • Software Development (30 Credits) - Compulsory

      The module covers the software development process from requirements elicitation and design, to team development, documentation, maintenance, and quality assurance. The development paradigm will be object-oriented, and students will employ an integrated development environment for code management, and utilise associated tools for version control, testing and system documentation. The module also aims to guide the student learner through agile principles and practises, including requirements gathering, planning, test-driven development and refactoring. During this phase of the course students will gain experience using a range of software modelling tools.

    • Individual Project (60 Credits) - Compulsory

      The project module aims to develop the students knowledge and skills required for planning and executing research projects such as proof of concept projects or empirical studies related to computer science. To plan and carry out their projects the students will have to:- Apply theories, methods and techniques previously learned Critically analyse and evaluate research results drawing on knowledge from other modules Develop their communication skills to enable them to communicate their findings competently in written and oral form​.

You can find more information about this course in the programme specification. Module and programme information is indicative and may be subject to change.

How will the MSc Computer Science be taught?

You’ll attend laboratory sessions, where you’ll do practical work designing, analysing and building software, as well as lectures and seminars, which will give you the opportunity to ask questions, take part in class discussions and talk about problems. Some work will be done in groups. In your spare time, as well as in directed study periods,you’ll do your own independent study and reading, which will include the use of online resources.

Assessment

Although there will be some tests, and a group viva as part of the software development module, there will be no written exams – you will be assessed entirely through coursework, presentations, reports, learning logbooks, practical software development assignments and group assignments. You will receive regular feedback on your work throughout the course.

For your independent project and dissertation you will plan, conduct and critically evaluate an analytical study. You will be assessed on your research proposal, written dissertation and a viva voce exam, in which you’ll justify and reflect on your work, and discuss possible further developments.

  1. UK & EU
  2. International
  3. How to apply
  1. UK & EU
  2. International

How can the MSc Computer Science support your career?

There is a very high demand worldwide for well-qualified IT graduates and this course will leave you perfectly placed to for a variety of roles in the software industry, such as software developer, IT systems architect, IT security coordinator, or information security analyst. You also have the opportunity to move into broader IT project management, systems design, consultancy or strategy planning. You might choose to specialise in a particular field, for example finance or security, or take on a managerial role.

The course's strong research slant creates an excellent foundation for further research in a wide range of topics.

Our graduates have gone on to work for software firms, computer manufacturers and specialist IT security consultancies. There are also opportunities within government departments, the health service, public services, financial institutions, management consultancies as well as in the media, transport, retail and education sectors. You could even start your own business.

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