Mathematics with Computing BSc/MSci | Middlesex University London
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Mathematics with Computing BSc/MSci

Learn about the course below
Code
BSc: G111
MSci: G11A
Start
Autumn 2018
Duration
BSc: 3 years full-time, 4 years with placement, 6 years part-time
MSci: 4 years part-time, 5 years with placement, 8 years part-time
Attendance
Full-time
Part-time
Fees
£9,250 (UK/EU) *
£13,000 (INT) *
Course leader
Matthew Jones

Mathematics and computing are subjects that have a lot in common. Students graduating from mathematics degrees often move into a diverse range of careers in computing. The BSc and MSci Mathematics with Computing degrees are designed to develop the knowledge and skills that are fundamental to a number of careers in the IT industry.

Why study BSc/MSci Mathematics with Computing at Middlesex University?

This BSc/MSci is a practical program of computing with a broad core knowledge of mathematical underpinnings. In contrast to many other mathematics provisions across the sector, Middlesex University adopts a teaching style that encourages small group work and peer-assisted learning. The first year modules in particular complement lectures with small group workshops supported by second and final year students.

Problem Solving Skills guides students through the process of developing software in order to solve a given problem. Students learn to develop and communicate strategies and algorithms specific to the problem.

Course highlights

  • You will be able to develop your own interests in an area of your choice
  • You will have the opportunity to partake in an optional placement
  • The hands on modules are taught by experienced experts in the field
  • The programme aims to foster a friendly and supportive learning environment that encourages student interaction

What will you study on the BSc/MSci Mathematics with Computing?

The programme begins where your previous learning ends, developing your knowledge of the core areas of mathematics fundamental to further study. You will develop your analytic and problem solving skills, learning how to communicate effectively complex ideas.

You will learn to programme throughout your degree, starting in the first year. Additionally you will learn how to develop and study algorithms and determine their efficiency, and you will find out how computers can learn beyond what is programmed. Options in your third year allow you to specialise in computer graphics, artificial intelligence or in other areas, tailoring your development towards your own career choice.

The four-year MSci Mathematics with Computing allows you to specialise in your final year to study a huge variety of subjects, thereby letting you develop your own work in a number of cutting-edge areas.

BSc Modules

  • Year 1

    • Vectors and Matrices (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Vectors and matrices are the mathematical building blocks used in areas ranging from theoretical physics to computer graphics, as well as providing the basis for an understanding of how structures in maths interact. This module will introduce you to the methods and techniques used to analyse vectors and matrices.

    • Calculus and Differential Equations (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Integration and differentiation are used to model situations in physics and engineering, as well as in other applications. In this module, we’ll look at how to describe these kinds of equations and you’ll be introduced to the importance of rigour in maths.

    • Logic and Structures (30 credits) - Compulsory

      One of the fundamental concepts in maths is how unknown ideas are deduced from things that are known. This module takes a closer look at the logic behind argument and develops a keener understanding about the structures that underlie this. The module will develop your appreciation of the way mathematicians think about topics and how we critically analyse arguments.

    • Data and Information (30 credits) - Compulsory

      We’ll begin to look at how maths is used to analyse information in this module. You will be introduced to some of the ideas behind how patterns and shapes can be deduced from given data and how we can use this information to model and estimate future trends.

  • Year 2

    • Algorithmic Complexity and Machine Learning (30 credits) - Compulsory

      This module has two components. First, the Algorithmic Complexity component introduces students to the theory of algorithms and data structures. Algorithms are at the core of every non-trivial computer program and application. Students will learn how to measure the efficiency of an algorithm in terms of its time and space requirements and distinguish between efficient and inefficient algorithmic solutions. General algorithmic design techniques as well as data structures for efficient data manipulation are taught. For this, we study fundamental problems such as sorting, searching, and discrete optimisation problems on graphs, strings and geometry.Second, the Machine Learning component introduces students to algorithmic approaches to learning from exemplar data. Students learn the process of representing training data within appropriate feature spaces for the purposes of classification. The major classifier types are taught before introducing students to specific instances of classifiers along with appropriate training protocols. Where classifiers have a relationship to statistical theory this is fully explored. Notions of structural risk with respect to model fitting are developed such that students are equipped with techniques for managing this in practical contexts.

    • Groups and Rings (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Groups and Rings are structures used throughout maths to emulate objects like whole numbers or matrices. In this module you’ll be introduced to these structures and you’ll study their properties and what they look like. You’ll find that from very humble beginnings groups and rings lead to a deep and rich theory.

    • Mathematical Analysis (30 credits) - Compulsory

      This module will begin by looking at what we really mean when we look at limits in mathematics and build on this to give you a greater understanding of series and calculus. The module builds on the ideas introduced in the level 4 modules about the need for rigour in maths. You will develop your ability to question mathematical arguments and to think logically about what definitions mean.

    • Problem Solving Methods (30 credits) - Compulsory

      The HE Maths Curriculum Summit (2011) recently concluded that “problem-solving is the most useful skill a student can take with them when they leave university”. This module fosters this skill in you by building on the approaches developed throughout the programme to enhance your ability to approach problems in diverse areas of maths and solve them. You will learn how to approach a problem, analyse its properties and develop a strategy to solve it. Rowlett, P. (Ed.) (2011, January), HE Mathematics Curriculum Summit

  • Year 3

    • Advanced Algebra (30 credits) - Compulsory

      This module will look at more advanced subjects in algebra. The module will further enhance your understanding of the often abstract nature of structures used in maths and how seemingly simple definitions lead to a great deal of rich and interesting ideas. The main thrust of this module will be Galois Theory, an important area that develops a deep relationship between groups and field.

    • Real and Complex Analysis (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Following from the previous module on mathematical analysis, this module will continue to develop your understanding of infinite and infinitesimal processes. You will also learn how extending the ideas developed here and in your previous module to complex numbers leads to a very different theory.

    • Communicating Mathematics (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Maths is often called the universal language of science but communicating it can be difficult. With the continuing move to more diverse platforms such as social media this leads to even more challenges in communicating maths. In this module you will look at how maths is communicated, be it to specialists, non-specialists, school pupils or CEOs and how to motivate it for these diverse audiences.

    • Project (30 credits) - Compulsory

      This is your chance to study an area of maths that you’re interested in and write your own report on it. You can choose your topic yourself or from a list given by staff. If you choose this module then you will have the opportunity to publish your work as an article in a journal.

    • Computer Graphics (30 credits) - Compulsory

      The aim of this module is to examine in depth the concepts and techniques needed in the construction of interactive graphics and visualisation systems covering advanced graphics programming techniques. It will cover theory and mathematics as required and It aims to provide students with practical experience via significant individual project work developing 2D and 3D programs using an industry standard environment.

    • Artificial Intelligence (30 credits) - Compulsory

      The aim of the module is to introduce students to a range of AI theories and techniques, including the most commonly used. This will extend to the ability to implement these techniques, and the students will extend their own development skills.

    • Combinatorics (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Combinatorics can be seen as the study of interactions and connections between people or objects. Examples of its use range from developing computer architectures to logistic management. In this module, you will develop the topics introduced in your level 5 discrete maths module to better understand these connections and how they are studied.

    • Multivariate Statistics (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Understanding and recognising patterns in data can be difficult when it comes from many different sources. In this module, you will begin to develop the techniques and tools that will enable you to study these kinds of relationships. You will develop a critical view of the pros and cons of the methods and the assumptions being made.

    • Simulation and Decision Making (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Simulating systems such as queuing times at hospitals, or traffic congestion in towns and cities is one of the most important tools used to inform management decisions. In this module, you will be introduced to mathematical simulation and you will learn how to develop models to study systems and improve efficiency.

    • Functional Analysis (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Functional analysis is the study of how structures made up of sets of functions behave; the subject is at the intersection of algebra, analysis and geometry. In this module, you will learn how infinite-dimensional algebraic structures act, what they look like geometrically and some of their properties.

    • Differential Equations (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Physical systems like pollution in the atmosphere, molecules in a liquid or interactions between planetary systems are all modelled using differential equations. In this module, you will continue with the topics introduced in level 4 and developed in level 5 to study these equations and their solutions.

MSci Modules

  • Year 1

    • Vectors and Matrices (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Vectors and matrices are the mathematical building blocks used in areas ranging from theoretical physics to computer graphics, as well as providing the basis for an understanding of how structures in maths interact. This module will introduce you to the methods and techniques used to analyse vectors and matrices.

    • Calculus and Differential Equations (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Integration and differentiation are used to model situations in physics and engineering, as well as in other applications. In this module, we’ll look at how to describe these kinds of equations and you’ll be introduced to the importance of rigour in maths.

    • Logic and Structures (30 credits) - Compulsory

      One of the fundamental concepts in maths is how unknown ideas are deduced from things that are known. This module takes a closer look at the logic behind argument and develops a keener understanding about the structures that underlie this. The module will develop your appreciation of the way mathematicians think about topics and how we critically analyse arguments.

    • Data and Information (30 credits) - Compulsory

      We’ll begin to look at how maths is used to analyse information in this module. You will be introduced to some of the ideas behind how patterns and shapes can be deduced from given data and how we can use this information to model and estimate future trends.

  • Year 2

    • Algorithmic Complexity and Machine Learning (30 credits) - Compulsory

      This module has two components. First, the Algorithmic Complexity component introduces students to the theory of algorithms and data structures. Algorithms are at the core of every non-trivial computer program and application. Students will learn how to measure the efficiency of an algorithm in terms of its time and space requirements and distinguish between efficient and inefficient algorithmic solutions. General algorithmic design techniques as well as data structures for efficient data manipulation are taught. For this, we study fundamental problems such as sorting, searching, and discrete optimisation problems on graphs, strings and geometry.Second, the Machine Learning component introduces students to algorithmic approaches to learning from exemplar data. Students learn the process of representing training data within appropriate feature spaces for the purposes of classification. The major classifier types are taught before introducing students to specific instances of classifiers along with appropriate training protocols. Where classifiers have a relationship to statistical theory this is fully explored. Notions of structural risk with respect to model fitting are developed such that students are equipped with techniques for managing this in practical contexts.

    • Groups and Rings (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Groups and Rings are structures used throughout maths to emulate objects like whole numbers or matrices. In this module you’ll be introduced to these structures and you’ll study their properties and what they look like. You’ll find that from very humble beginnings groups and rings lead to a deep and rich theory.

    • Mathematical Analysis (30 credits) - Compulsory

      This module will begin by looking at what we really mean when we look at limits in mathematics and build on this to give you a greater understanding of series and calculus. The module builds on the ideas introduced in the level 4 modules about the need for rigour in maths. You will develop your ability to question mathematical arguments and to think logically about what definitions mean.

    • Problem Solving Methods (30 credits) - Compulsory

      The HE Maths Curriculum Summit (2011) recently concluded that “problem-solving is the most useful skill a student can take with them when they leave university”. This module fosters this skill in you by building on the approaches developed throughout the programme to enhance your ability to approach problems in diverse areas of maths and solve them. You will learn how to approach a problem, analyse its properties and develop a strategy to solve it. Rowlett, P. (Ed.) (2011, January), HE Mathematics Curriculum Summit

  • Year 3

    • Advanced Algebra (30 credits) - Compulsory

      This module will look at more advanced subjects in algebra. The module will further enhance your understanding of the often abstract nature of structures used in maths and how seemingly simple definitions lead to a great deal of rich and interesting ideas. The main thrust of this module will be Galois Theory, an important area that develops a deep relationship between groups and field.

    • Real and Complex Analysis (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Following from the previous module on mathematical analysis, this module will continue to develop your understanding of infinite and infinitesimal processes. You will also learn how extending the ideas developed here and in your previous module to complex numbers leads to a very different theory.

    • Communicating Mathematics (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Maths is often called the universal language of science but communicating it can be difficult. With the continuing move to more diverse platforms such as social media this leads to even more challenges in communicating maths. In this module you will look at how maths is communicated, be it to specialists, non-specialists, school pupils or CEOs and how to motivate it for these diverse audiences.

    • Project (30 credits) - Compulsory

      This is your chance to study an area of maths that you’re interested in and write your own report on it. You can choose your topic yourself or from a list given by staff. If you choose this module then you will have the opportunity to publish your work as an article in a journal.

    • Computer Graphics (30 credits) - Compulsory

      The aim of this module is to examine in depth the concepts and techniques needed in the construction of interactive graphics and visualisation systems covering advanced graphics programming techniques. It will cover theory and mathematics as required and It aims to provide students with practical experience via significant individual project work developing 2D and 3D programs using an industry standard environment.

    • Artificial Intelligence (30 credits) - Compulsory

      The aim of the module is to introduce students to a range of AI theories and techniques, including the most commonly used. This will extend to the ability to implement these techniques, and the students will extend their own development skills.

    • Combinatorics (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Combinatorics can be seen as the study of interactions and connections between people or objects. Examples of its use range from developing computer architectures to logistic management. In this module, you will develop the topics introduced in your level 5 discrete maths module to better understand these connections and how they are studied.

    • Multivariate Statistics (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Understanding and recognising patterns in data can be difficult when it comes from many different sources. In this module, you will begin to develop the techniques and tools that will enable you to study these kinds of relationships. You will develop a critical view of the pros and cons of the methods and the assumptions being made.

    • Simulation and Decision Making (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Simulating systems such as queuing times at hospitals, or traffic congestion in towns and cities is one of the most important tools used to inform management decisions. In this module, you will be introduced to mathematical simulation and you will learn how to develop models to study systems and improve efficiency.

    • Functional Analysis (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Functional analysis is the study of how structures made up of sets of functions behave; the subject is at the intersection of algebra, analysis and geometry. In this module, you will learn how infinite-dimensional algebraic structures act, what they look like geometrically and some of their properties.

    • Differential Equations (30 credits) - Compulsory

      Physical systems like pollution in the atmosphere, molecules in a liquid or interactions between planetary systems are all modelled using differential equations. In this module, you will continue with the topics introduced in level 4 and developed in level 5 to study these equations and their solutions.

  • Year 4

    • Reading Course (30 credits) - Optional

      This module allows you to work in small groups studying a substantial topic of advanced mathematics. You will be allowed to choose from a list of possible topics that are described in a body of literature, either in the form of a book or a number of research or other articles. As with the Project, this module will let you design your degree programme to suit your interests.

    • Advanced Topics in Mathematics A and B (30 credits) - Optional

      These two modules allow you to study, in depth, an advanced topic in mathematics or an application of specialist mathematics. The subject of the module, either a contemporary or classical area of mathematics, will change periodically reflecting the interests of staff in the department, and the interests of the students studying it. As an Msci student these two modules give you the chance to experience the dynamic nature of modern mathematics and how it is applied, and serves to illustrate the ever changing character of the subject. This module allows you to encounter cutting edge areas of modern mathematics.

    • Optional Modules

      There are a range of additional optional modules that you will be able to take during your fourth year that will continue building your knowledge and skills from previous modules to a more  advanced level of study.

You can find more information about this course in the programme specification. Module and programme information is indicative and may be subject to change.

  1. Overview
  2. Teaching and learning
  3. Assessment and feedback
  1. UK & EU
  2. International
  3. How to apply
  1. UK & EU
  2. International

How can the BSc/MSci Mathematics with Computing support your career?

Graduates of mathematics courses are employed as professional mathematicians in many organisations, for example GCHQ, where they work on solving abstract problems that directly influence government policy. Mathematics is also fundamental to many other sectors such as commerce, economics, computing, finance, and accounting.

The analytical and logical skills that maths students develop make them well suited to careers in areas such as law. Their ability to analyse and solve complex problems means they are sought after by employers and also demand some of the highest starting salaries.

Other courses

Mathematics BSc/MMath

Start: October 2018

Duration: 3 years full-time

Code: G100

Computer Science BSc

Start: October 2018, EU/International induction: September 2018

Duration: 3 years full-time, 4 years with placement

Code: G404

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