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Rediscovering the Ottoman Empire & Minority Rights in the Middle East

Event information

START DATE 18 October 2013
START TIME 12:00am
LOCATION

Middlesex University
G44 3.30 - 5.30 pm; Atrium 5.30-7.30 pm
Grove Building
Hendon Campus, London, NW4 4BT

END DATE 18 October 2013
END TIME 12:00am

Middlesex University School of Law is delighted to invite you to a special lecture and book launch on: Minority Rights in the Middle East by Joshua Castellino and Kathleen A. Cavanaugh

Middlesex University School of Law is delighted to invite you to a special lecture and book launch on: Minority Rights in the Middle East by Joshua Castellino and Kathleen A. Cavanaugh.

3:30-4:30pm: Lecture
4:30- 5:00pm: Book Launch followed by drinks reception

About the Book

Challenging some of the existing narratives on minorities in the Middle East, this book provides an overview of the historical social formation of minority groups within the region and examines how the status of these groups, as well as their relationship with a range of legal frameworks, have shifted and changed over time. The rights of minorities in the Middle East are subject to a range of legal frameworks, having developed in part from Islamic law, and in recent years subject to international human rights law and institutional frameworks. The book examines the context in which minority rights operate within this conflicted region, investigating how minorities engage with (or are excluded from) various sites of power and how states practice in dealing with minorities (often ostensibly based on Islamic authority) intersects with and informs modern constitutionalism and international law.

The book identifies who exactly can be classed as a minority group, analysing in detail the different religious and ethnic minorities across the region. The book also pays special attention to the plight of minorities who are spread between various states, often as the result of conflict. It asse sses the applicable domestic legislative instruments within the three countries investigated as case studies: Iraq, Syria and Lebanon, and highlights key domestic remedies that could serve as
models for ensuring greater social cohesion and greater inclusion of minorities in the political life of these countries.

For further details please contact Christiana Rose at C.Rose@mdx.ac.uk

 

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