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    LGBT History Month at Middlesex

    Event information

    START DATE 2 February 2016
    START TIME 11:30am

    Middlesex University, The Burroughs, London NW44BT

    END DATE 26 February 2016
    END TIME 05:00pm

    Middlesex University and the staff LGBT Forum invite all staff, students, friends and supporters to attend a series of on-campus events seeking to raise awareness, acknowledge our history and create discussion.

    For more information and to register to attend, please contact Alfonso Pezzella.

    2 February 2016
    College Building, C127 

    Gender identity and sexuality: A workshop on pronouns! 

    This workshop explores ideas that gender is constructed, looks at frequency of gender fluidity and also explores the complexity of definition. It questions how gender neutral identities sit with a psychological need for many, to assess others, searching for certainty to inform how to react. 

    The workshop will give the audience a chance to consider how to work with gender neutral or fluidity and to try out gender neutral pronouns in order to offer respect and acknowledgement of different perspectives.

    9 February 2016
    Sheppard Library, S110

    Liberating our minds: Gay liberation and the history and future of psychiatry 

    This talk will explore how LGB activists have historically challenged and continue to challenge psychiatric and mental health practice. The exploration will include how LGB people developed alternative understandings of our mental health, based on lived experience of both mental distress and mainstream service use. 

    The talk will conclude by looking at some of the challenges ahead for the mental health and wellbeing of LGB individuals and communities.

    15 February 2016
    Sheppard Library, S110

    Out at work: Barriers and benefits of being 'out' at work and the impact on mental health

    The talk will report findings from a small scale research study on LGBT employees' experiences of disclosing their sexual identity at work and the effects this might have on their career progress, wellbeing and mental health (Pezzella, 2015). The talk will focus on reported themes of the benefits of being out at work and what are the barriers of why some people feel unable to disclose their sexuality at work. 

    We will then link the thoughts across to workplace mental health in general and the issue of 'double disclosure dilemma' at work that some LGB or T people face if they have mental health problems too. This can make things very difficult as homosexuality was until relatively recently classified as a mental illness itself. So we potentially deal with compounded stigma. The talk will draw on personal experiences as well as the research. 

    We believe that a supported, happy, out employee will be more loyal and more productive (as Stonewall found).

    16 February 2016
    Committee Room 2, Town Hall 

    LGBT & Sexual Health 

    The session will be an interactive session covering sexual health, chemsex, and safer sex. We will look at sexually transmitted infections and why certain groups of men and women are more at risk of these infections. 

    The session will commence with a socrative quiz, so attendees should bring their mobile phones and log on to the socrative website as a student.

    17 February 2016
    College Building, C126

    Trans & Mental Health

    This session will look at the recent spotlight on trans issues and why this can harm as well as hinder mental health. It will also consider some of the research (or lack of it!) in this vital area. The session will also consider the future and what we can all do.

    23 February 2016
    Sheppard Library, S110

    Resilience and discomfort: Learning through the arts about complexity and ambiguity of LGBTIQ experiences

    Much effective social work relies on understanding the emotional world of the people with whom we work to form positive relationships. Social work texts provide one type of knowledge.

    This lecture will argue that the arts in their widest sense are well placed to help us improve our emotional repertoire, as they are better placed to describe complexity and diversity. The subject engages our emotions. We will argue that the overlapping of the two disciplines helps us develop emotional resilience as we become more knowledgeable about unfamiliar territory and more confident to live with uncertainty.

    The lecture will give examples of LGBTIQ experiences expressed as art by LGBTIQ artists.

    25 February 2016

    Getting on: The interaction of LGBT&I communities with care services later in life 

    Substantial transformation of political, legislative, policy and social change in relation to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBT&I) human rights in the UK has led to a general softening of public and political attitudes to LGBT&I communities. Despite increased visibility through civil partnership, marriage rights, adoption and 'families of choice'; LGBT&I older people have least capitalised on the changes achieved. 

    Conservative estimates suggest that between 871,045 -1,219,470 of the LGBT population in the UK are over 65 with increasing interaction with care services. However, the concerns among older LGBT&I people about health and social care provision in later life remains well documented. 

    Moving into and living in a care home is a particularly isolating and fearful experience and access to external advocates is highly important to wellbeing, dignity and safety. 

    This presentation explores the evidence and issues with reference to a current project sponsored by the Comic Relief Care Home Challenge aimed at enhancing social inclusion of older LGBT&I residents. Proactive outreach into the LGBT&I community and active engagement with those who can provide advocacy has resulted in the recruitment of Community Advisors to help the organisation develop inclusive LGBT&I friendly environments. 

    I will discuss some of the benefits and challenges of such an approach and discuss how developing a co-productive approach can enhance strategies to support positive LGBT&I ageing.

    26 February 2016
    The Grove Atrium

    Student LGBT presentations: A collaborative event between the Schools of Art & Design and Health & Education

    Middlesex University and the staff LGBT Forum invite all staff, students, friends and supporters to attend any of these events as we seek to raise awareness, acknowledge our history and create discussion. Student LGBT presentations: a collaborative event between the Schools of Art & Design and Health & Education, featuring Sarah Lewis-Brooke, Kerri Jefferis, Bharain Mac an Bhreithiun and Suzanne Van Rossenberg.

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