Public programming? Pedagogical practices in a missing Europe | Middlesex University London
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    Public programming? Pedagogical practices in a missing Europe

    Event information

    START DATE 30 June 2016
    START TIME 12:00pm
    LOCATION

    Mddlesex University, Room C107, Main College Building

    END DATE 30 June 2016
    END TIME 06:00pm

    This study day will examine public programming from the perspective of its legacies and the current responsibilities faced by artists, curators and educators using this framework for their public intellectual activities

    A study day organized by theSocially Engaged Practices” Research Cluster at Middlesex University, in collaboration with Nottingham Contemporary and Goldsmiths College. With: Felicity Allen | Valerio del Baglivo | Jason Bowman | Ben Cranfield | Graeme Evans | Paul Goodwin | Janna Graham | Valeria Graziano | Alana Jelinek | Susan Kelly

    The term 'public programming’, in use at least since the 1990s, has recently re-emerged as a framework to speak about the pedagogical initiatives across various public cultural institutions in the European context and beyond.

    It continues legacies from gallery education, new institutionalism, and independent pedagogic projects, which have contributed to productions by and formations of art audiences.

    Reminiscent of the interventions of public programming in the 1970s and early 1980s, the re-vitalised form now also provides a space of intervention in public questions affecting the broader body politic. However, the democratic and critical premises that were the basis of a publicly produced culture are now being undone, caught in the paradoxes of post-democratic institutions and under the pervasive push of event economies.

    Moreover, the prospect of Europe as a space for a more just political organisation is deteriorating, leaving many with a sense of a missed opportunity and missing potential.

    Starting from these considerations, the study day will examine public programming from the perspective of its legacies and the current responsibilities faced by artists, curators and educators using this framework for their public intellectual activities. Through conversations and round tables, we will seek possible answers to the question: Could public programme activities invent alternative trajectories for a European project building on our collective democratic aspirations?

    Free event, but limited space.

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