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    Hendon Town Hall Chambers

    Middlesex University Mooting ChambersExperience the buzz and atmosphere of the court room in our specialist chambers located inside Hendon Town Hall, which was built in 1901.

    Features of the original council chambers, which can hold up to 150 students, are a judges' bench, seating for counsel and court clerks, and a public gallery, making the venue the perfect place to hold moots (mock court), as well as law lectures and debates.

    You can explore the chambers in more detail using our virtual tour.

    What is mooting?

    Mooting describes the simulation of court procedures, typically an appeal against a final decision. It is "mock court" where students are given a problem to analyse, and then conduct research to prepare written and oral arguments. There are usually two grounds of appeal argued by each side.

    What happens during "mock court"?

    Mock court is a simulation of actual court proceedings. Typically, the judge enters, the mooters and judge bow, the clerk announces the matter, and the mooters make their presentation. After this, the judge will ask questions, and the court will adjourn. The judge then returns to deliver the judgement and feedback.

    Why is mooting important?

    Mooting is an essential experience that enables students to practice and develop skills in persuasion, advocacy, argument, and interpretation of legal principles, as well as get used to the court environment and procedures. 

    Law students at Middlesex University practice mooting on the following law courses: LLB Commercial Law; European Law and Politics; Law; Law with Criminology; Law with Human Rights; Law with International Relations; and BA Law.

    Moot chambers Middlesex University

    What is mooting?

    Mooting describes the simulation of court procedures, typically an appeal against a final decision. It is "mock court" where students are given a problem to analyse, and then conduct research to prepare written and oral arguments. There are usually two grounds of appeal argued by each side.

    What happens during "mock court"?

    Mock court is a simulation of actual court proceedings. Typically, the judge enters, the mooters and judge bow, the clerk announces the matter, and the mooters make their presentation. After this, the judge will ask questions, and the court will adjourn. The judge then returns to deliver the judgement and feedback.

    Why is mooting important?

    Mooting is an essential experience that enables students to practice and develop skills in persuasion, advocacy, argument, and interpretation of legal principles, as well as get used to the court environment and procedures. 

    Law students at Middlesex University practice mooting on the following courses: LLB Commercial Law; European Law and Politics; Law; Law with Criminology; Law with Human Rights; Law with International Relations; and BA Law.

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