A tribute to renowned Middlesex criminologist Jock Young | Middlesex University London
Saved pages
0

    Close window

    Section navigation

    A tribute to renowned Middlesex criminologist Jock Young

    27/11/2013
    Middlesex University professors Vincenzo Ruggiero and Tony Goodman have paid tribute to influential criminologist Professor Jock Young who passed away on 16 November 2013.


    Middlesex University professors Vincenzo Ruggiero and Tony Goodman have paid tribute to influential criminologist Professor Jock Young who passed away on 16 November 2013. 

    Professors Ruggiero and Goodman said:

    We are extremely sad to announce that Professor Jock Young has passed away in New York. Professor Young started working at Middlesex in 1966 and stayed with us until 2003.

    His work has been outstanding and acknowledged all over the world. A founder of critical criminology, he was a most prolific writer and each of his books became international events within the criminological community. With Taylor and Walton, he co-authored ‘The New Criminology’ in 1973, famously described by Alvin Gouldner as re-directing ‘the total structure of technical discourse concerning crime and deviance through its assaults on classicist and positivist thinking about crime and appeal for a  fully social theory of deviance’.

    It is not an exaggeration to say that each time he elaborated a new idea, he automatically became the unwitting founder of a new school of thought. As a coordinator of the original masters course in Deviancy and Social Policy, he made Middlesex provision in the field renowned internationally.

    His most recent books constitute a formidable trilogy: ‘The Exclusive Society’, ‘The Vertigo of Late Modernity’ and ‘The Criminological Imagination’. His lasting legacy is a mark of his extraordinary academic career which makes everyone at Middlesex University profoundly proud.

    An exquisite gentleman, he was a joy to work with: always approachable, with a subtle sense of humour and an enviable self-irony. An example of this self-irony was a comment he liked to make: every time he re-read his own books, he said, he found some contradictory claims in them… this compelled him to write a new one. We should all follow his example.

    Comments (0)


    Leave your comment

    In this section

    Back to top

    We use Cookies

    View our Privacy and Cookie policy

    Continue