Justice, values and rights

Research into new and emerging topics

Our work covers human rights law, criminal justice, crime, migration, social justice and employee voice.

We develop close partnerships with other universities, research centres, non-governmental organisations, government departments and practitioners.

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Making care homes more LGBT-inclusive

We worked with older members of the LGBT community to understand how care environments, staff training and recruitment can be made more inclusive for them. Then we trained and supported staff from across six Anchor care homes in London to put our findings into practice, funded by Comic Relief.

Our research shows that many older LGBT people undergo traumatic experiences when going into a care home with some even going back into the closet after living openly. This can be because they’re unsure of how fellow residents and staff will react to their sexuality.

Demonstrating best practice for all care homes

Professor of Social Care, Dr Trish Hafford-Letchfield, worked with academics from the University of Bristol, the University of Manchester and the University of Hertfordshire on a pioneering evidence-based assessment and development tool. It's been cited by the Care Quality Commission as an example of best practice in enabling more care homes to become LGBT-inclusive.

Community advisors discussing issues with Care Home Managers

Dr Trish Hafford-Letchfield and her research

Dr Trish Hafford-Letchfield is Professor of Social Care and a qualified nurse, social worker and educator with substantial experiences of managing social work services for older people in social care. Her research interests centre on improving the quality of care for people in marginalised communities and she is Co-Director for the Centre for Co-production in Mental Health and Social Work. She is currently developing a programme of research around older people living in care homes with suicide ideation and behaviour.

Shaping democracy and law in Europe

Our research shows how people-focused policies can bridge the divide between the European Union and its citizens, improving individual, social and political welfare. Our work shows how this can counter the recent rise in distrust of European institutions and concerns that they don’t respond appropriately to the needs of citizens.

Reconciling the European Union with its citizens

Led by Professor Laurent Pech, Head of the Department of Law, this work demonstrates how the European Union can become more attuned to the expectations of its citizens. It also looks at any inconsistencies in democracy and the rule of law across the European Union and how this might affect the legitimacy of the Union.

Reconciling Europe with its Citizens through Democracy and the Rule of Law is a four year project funded by Horizon 2020 and brings together 18 academic partner institutions from across 14 countries.

More about this project

Professor Laurent Pech

Professor Laurent Pech is a Professor of European Law and Head of the Law and Politics Department. His most recent publications focusing on the rule of law include Judicial independence under threat: The Court of Justice to the rescue (2018) and 55 Common Market Law Review 1827-1854 (co-authored with Professor Platon).

Professor Pech was recently named one of the top 40 European Union digital influencers by EURACTIV. He was awarded The Good Lobby Academic of the Year 2018 Award for his impact on the ongoing threats to the rule of law in the European Union.

Moving away from the death penalty

Our research investigates the use of capital punishment across the world and explores the worldwide decline in using the death penalty.

Professor William Schabas, Professor of International Law, has found that it is virtually disappearing in Europe and South America as well as in much of Africa and parts of Asia. Even countries that retain the death penalty are manifesting a growing reluctance to using it, with a few exceptions.

Impact on the death penalty worldwide

This research combines empirical analysis of trends in the practice with study of the legal features of the debate, particularly in international human rights law. By increasing our understanding of trends in the reduction and abolition of capital punishment, our work supports the development of strategies that can promote an end to it. Legal analysis work is also important for work to establish limits on the practice.

The Third of May 1808, by Francisco Goya, Museo del Prado in Madrid

Professor William Schabas and his work

Professor William Schabas is Professor of International Law at Middlesex. He is also a Professor of International Human Law and Human Rights at Leiden University, distinguished visiting faculty at Sciences Po in Paris and Honorary Chairman of the Irish Centre for Human Rights.

He is the author of more than 20 books in the fields of human rights and international criminal law. Professor Schabas drafted the 2010 and 2015 United Nations quinquennial reports on the death penalty. He was a member of the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

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