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Studying in autumn 2020 during coronavirus
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Foundation Year in Science

Learn about the course below

Foundation Year in Science

Code
See How to apply tab
Start
October 2020
Duration
1 year full-time
+ 3 years full-time
Attendance
Full-time
Fees
£9,250 (UK/EU) *
£13,700 (INT) *
Course leader
Helen Roberts

We’re planning to teach through a flexible combination of online and face to face learning as we start the new academic year. If you’re thinking about starting in autumn 2020, there’s more detail on how we’ll deliver your course below, and in particular on the ‘Teaching’ tab under ‘Teaching and learning – changes for students in 2020’.

This course is now available in Clearing.
Follow this link or call 020 8411 6565 for more info

The Foundation Year in Science is offered as an entry route to a wide range of science degrees operating in the faculty of Science and Technology from those in biology, biochemistry, pharrmaceutical chemistry, biomedical sciences, environmental sciences, environmental health, public health or nutrition degree. We have similar foundation year options for computing. engineering, sports science, psychology and law. It is specifically for students who don't yet meet the entry requirements for degree-level study.

Why study the Foundation Year in Science at Middlesex University?

You enrol on a four-year course, which includes the one-year foundation course. If you complete this year successfully you progress directly to the course your applied for – you can also transfer to other degree courses in science subject to availability. The number of students who progress to degree study is  high and in fact many foundation year students have gone on to become some of our most successful graduates.

The Foundation Year is for you if:

  • you do not have the right qualifications for a full degree
  • you feel you are not yet ready for degree-level study
  • you are returning to study and feel you need some help to get up to speed with the demands of learning before embarking on a degree.

How to apply

If you are interested in studying the foundation year you must apply to one of our four-year degree courses. Please have a look at the How to apply tab for further information. Successful completion of the foundation year guarantees entry to your chosen degree.

We offer:

*Please note that it is not possible to apply for the MSci route with a foundation year.


Find out more

Sign up now to receive more information about studying at Middlesex University London, including updates on places available in Clearing for 2020 entry.

What will you study on the Foundation Year in Science?

You will study all four modules simultaneously over the year which means you have the chance to examine topics in-depth.​ As a student of this course you'll receive a free electronic textbook for every module.​

Modules

We’ve made sure that the skills and knowledge that you’ll gain on your course will not change during the coronavirus outbreak. If you’re applying to start this course or progressing into year one, two or three this autumn, your module information is below.

  • Core modules

    • Life Sciences (30 credits) - Compulsory

      This module explores fundamental concepts and principles in biology and chemistry to support future studies in programmes related to life sciences. Lectures will provide explanations of key biological and chemical concepts, seminars and workshops will consist of interactive activities and group events, and lab sessions will enable you to develop core laboratory skills and practice.

    • SMART (Students Mastering Academic writing, Research and Technology) (30 credits) - Compulsory​

      This module introduces some fundamental mathematical topics and concepts that are required in a range of subjects studied at degree level. In a structured and supportive environment, you will begin to develop an appreciation of the importance of mathematics as an aid to understand and describe abstract ideas.

    • Foundation Mathematics (30 credits) - Compulsory​

      This module introduces some fundamental mathematical topics and concepts that are required in a range of subjects studied at degree level. In a structured and supportive environment, you will begin to develop an appreciation of the importance of mathematics as an aid to understand and describe abstract ideas.

    • Chemistry (30 credits) - Compulsory​

      The aim of this module is to provide you with an understanding of the fundamental concepts in chemistry and biochemistry to support your future studies in Natural Sciences. You will study a range of topics such as atomic structure, chemical bonding, acids and bases, and chemical equilibria. Your learning will be enhanced through laboratory sessions, enabling you to put theory into practice.

More information about this course

See the course specification for more information:

Optional modules are usually available at levels 5 and 6, although optional modules are not offered on every course. Where optional modules are available, you will be asked to make your choice during the previous academic year. If we have insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, or there are staffing changes which affect the teaching, it may not be offered. If an optional module will not run, we will advise you after the module selection period when numbers are confirmed, or at the earliest time that the programme team make the decision not to run the module, and help you choose an alternative module.

How is the Foundation Year in Science taught?

The Foundation year aims to engage you in all aspects of your learning.

You will gain knowledge, understanding and skills through interactive online lectures, and workshops, online activities and tests, guided research, individual and group projects and virtual laboratories and face to face laboratories, COVID-19 permitting. You will receive formative verbal feedback in live teaching practical sessions and summative feedback is provided electronically and/or verbally.

Assessment

We’re planning to deliver our assessment in a similar way to previous years. We will review this regularly, and let you know in advance of your assessment if we need to make any changes.

Your knowledge and understanding is assessed by individual written assignments and tests, pair and group presentations, learning logs, and demonstrations.

Teaching and learning – changes for students in 2020

If you’re starting university in 2020, we’ll be teaching you in different ways to make sure you get the best learning experience possible. You’ll learn through live sessions with teaching staff and have the chance to study independently too, with access to all the online resources you need through our globally available student portal.

We’re planning different scenarios for teaching so that we can be flexible. While we’re social distancing, we’re aiming to teach you through some small group sessions on campus, with other interactive teaching as well as larger lectures delivered online and recorded sessions available to you on-demand. If you’re unable to make it to campus at first, or we need to limit access to campus in the future, your course can be delivered fully online.

The table below shows current plans for your learning across a typical week, including scheduled live online teaching and an indication of what we hope to teach face to face, where you can make it to campus. While some weeks might look different to this, due to how we schedule classes and make arrangements for any face to face sessions (for example, in some cases these could take place every two weeks with an increased number of hours), the table gives you an idea of what to expect based on the overall number of teaching hours on your course.

You’ll receive final arrangements for your teaching and a full course timetable before you start.

Scenario 1: Course delivered fully online

Live learning

Contact time per week, per level:

10 hours

Self-paced learning time

Contact time per week for each level:

35 hours

On demand resources

Contact time per week for each level:

3.08 hours

Scenario 2: Course delivered with a mix of online and face to face learning with social distancing in place

Live learning

Contact time per week, per level:

10 hours

Self-paced learning time

Average hours per week, per level:

33.5 hours

On demand resources

Average hours per week, per level:

3.08 hours

Face-to-face sessions

Contact time per week, per level:

4 days on campus planned for laboratory practical work; 18 days for classroom activities. This will work out roughly 1 day per week overall.

Read more about our scenarios for returning to campus and what they might mean for your teaching and learning experience, and how you’ll be able to access student support.

Future plans for teaching

We’re developing our timetable for face to face teaching with current government advice on social distancing to keep you safe. If social distancing requirements are lifted, we’ll start to safely move back towards our usual teaching arrangements with more opportunities for face to face learning. Some learning and support might stay online in this scenario. If more restrictions are put in place, or there is another lockdown, we’ll be prepared to deliver your learning and support fully online, with alternative arrangements made for any required placements. We’ll always give you notice of any changes that we make.

Definitions of terms

  • Live learning – Live learning will cover everything you’ll do with teaching staff like lectures, seminars, workshops and other classes, and we’ll schedule all of this for you. This might include some study outside your regular timetable, like taking part in discussion forums or online blogs where you’re supported by academic staff.
  • Independent learning – Independent learning is all the studying you’ll do outside your live learning sessions with teaching staff. This self-paced study will give you the chance to learn, prepare, revise and reflect in your own time as you need to, and you’ll have access to on-demand resources and materials to help you do your best.
    • Self-paced study – Self-paced study will give you the chance to learn wherever and whenever you want to and at your own pace, outside your live learning sessions. This independent learning could include reading and reflection, preparation for classes, revision or homework along with access to other online activities such as quizzes.
    • On-demand resources – You'll have access to on-demand resources like pre-recorded video lectures and workshops as part of your independent study. You’ll be able to review and revisit whenever you need to at your own pace.
  • Face to face sessions – Wherever it’s possible to do so, and we can make the necessary arrangements to ensure your safety, you’ll be able to attend scheduled sessions, workshops or appointments on campus as part of your live learning. The number of hours given in this scenario provides an indication of the number of hours of face to face learning you could expect, and a full timetable will be provided to you before the start of your course.

Support

You’ll have a strong support network available to you to make sure you develop all the necessary academic skills you need to do well on your course.

Our support services will mainly be delivered online and you’ll have access to a range of different resources so you can get the help you need, whether you’re studying at home or have the opportunity to come to campus.

You’ll have access to one to one and group sessions for personal learning and academic support from our library and IT teams, and our network of learning experts. Our teams will also be here to offer financial advice, and personal wellbeing, mental health and disability support.

More on teaching for your subject in 2020/21

Read our guide to what’s been happening in your subject area recently and more about what to expect this autumn.

  1. UK & EU
  2. International
  3. How to apply
  1. UK & EU
  2. International
  3. Additional costs


We’ll carefully manage any future changes to courses, or the support and other services available to you, if these are necessary because of things like changes to government health and safety advice, or any changes to the law.

Any decisions will be taken in line with both external advice and the University’s Regulations which include information on this.

Our priority will always be to maintain academic standards and quality so that your learning outcomes are not affected by any adjustments that we may have to make.

At all times we’ll aim to keep you well informed of how we may need to respond to changing circumstances, and about support that we’ll provide to you.

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